Robert Woehrle ...
Robert Woehrle ...
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HOW TO GET PAID WHAT YOU'RE WORTH



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Everyone knows the potential perks of negotiating your salary, including higher pay and better benefits. But it can feel awkward or even scary to negotiate when you're interviewing for a new job or looking for a change. 

Many people are hesitant to negotiate because they don't feel like they have enough experience doing it, or because the thought simply stresses them out. As a result, they wind up accepting an initial offer without discussion. 

This can be a huge mistake. Recruiters and hiring managers expect you to negotiate, and will often start with a low-ball offer. 

Even if you just entered the workforce, you could be agreeing to less compensation than the company is willing to pay. Even a small increase at the start of a job can have a wonderful rolling-down-the-hill effect, including with future raises and bonuses. 

So why not give negotiating a try? 







DO YOUR RESEARCH


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The Internet offers a wealth of information regarding the company and the job you're applying for, but that's only the beginning. 

If you can, you should talk directly with people in your role at several similar companies. Reach out through LinkedIn or through your network. You'd be surprised at how helpful a first-connection can be when researching salaries. Ask if a range can be specified, and gain more insight about general work responsibilities. This will strengthen your knowledge of the industry and get you ready to talk intelligently with your hiring manager. 







THINK ABOUT THE BIG PICTURE


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We all know that cash is king - but it's not the end-all-be-all. When negotiating, you should consider everything that comes with the job - not just your salary. 

If time off is important to you, consider asking for a bigger vacation package or for scheduled work-from-home days. If you have a family, consider asking about child care or transportation costs and if your potential employer is willing to help with those costs. 

For many people, personal development is also key, so ask what courses or opportunities might be available through the company. Not only will this be beneficial for you, but it shows your future employer that you're willing to learn and invest yourself in the company, upping your earning potential.  








JUSTIFY YOUR REQUESTS


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Doing your research and learning the market is crucial when negotiating a higher salary, but so are your skills and experience.

Be prepared for interviewers to ask about your current pay. Prepare to answer with a range, with the highest number being your dream salary and the low number being midpoint between your dream salary and the minimum you need to live.

Early on in the process, if the company's salary range for the position you want is not listed on the job description, you should ask so you're not disappointed down the road. The worst thing is to go through multiple interviews only to find out that the salary offered is not even close to what you need or want. 

If you're shooting for your dream salary, you must demonstrate why you deserve it. 

Stick to the facts and figures - it's much more impressive to say that you increased revenue by 3% than it is to say that you enjoyed working on a team that increased revenue. It's your time to shine - and numbers are the key to shine brightly. 








DON'T STOP NEGOTIATING AFTER YOU'RE HIRED


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Many employers offer modest pay increases each year. However, unless you get a promotion (or sometimes even when you do) it can be hard to secure a significant raise. 

However, it's in your company's best interest to keep you if you're good at your job. Remember, it's expensive to find, hire, and train someone new.  Many employers would rather give a pay bump to an existing employee than do the leg work for a new hire.

A way to successfully negotiate your salary is requesting that your boss do an industry assessment of your job role if you've had the job for more than five years. "This would entail the company comparing the responsibilities and compensation for employees at your level with similar employees at other companies. 












For more, visit discover.com




MORE ON IMPROVING YOUR JOB SATISFACTION

 
 
 
  Here's How to Ask Your Employer for a Pay Raise
  Do you want to make more money from your job? If so, you need to know how to ask for a pay raise. Follow these steps for your best chance for a raise.

 
 
"Demonstrating consistently good performance is key to retaining responsibilities and boosting your salary."

 


 
 
  17 Things (Other Than Salary) You Can Negotiate When You Take a Job
  Yes, you can ask for more vacation days.

 

 
 






     
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Robert Woehrle ... 
4152879100 eee
robert33@woehrle.com
eee2

         



               

   



 
Robert Woehrle ... 
4152879100 eee
robert33@woehrle.com
eee2




   



   



 
Robert Woehrle ... 
4152879100 eee
robert33@woehrle.com
eee2